19 Museum Street

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Warrington - A Town of Many Industries

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This page launched Tuesday, 9 February 2016

"Us and Them and Way Back When"

 

“Us and Them and
Way Back When"
Heritage Project

The Relationships Centre is a charity supporting young people and their families. It is based at 19 Museum Street in Warrington town centre.

About the project.

We are looking at what life was like for young people in Victorian Warrington. The research is based on the families who lived in our property, 19 Museum Street, and the neighbouring properties at 17 and 21, from 1877, when our property was built. We are also looking at the workhouse and the fustian industry in Lymm. Information on that will follow later.

Inspired by our building, our young people have delved into the lives of youngsters of the past to discover what life was like for them way back when.

By researching the inhabitant’s of our building and the neighbouring addresses, participants have used the key themes of emotional health, physical health and wellbeing, education, expectations of behaviour and punishments, and networks and support to explore the experiences of Warrington’s teenagers over the past 130 years. They have investigated support systems of the past available to teenagers experiencing challenges in their life and compared them to the support available today.

Our young people have, through research and interviewing people within the community, uncovered a wealth of information of Warrington’s past. The work created will continue to build a portfolio for some of our young people, which will be accredited by a nationally recognised Arts Award.

We are also engaging with pupils from St Gregory’s High School and Penketh High School, who are to engage with the project in history, art and drama classes.

To share this heritage with the wider community, our young people will exhibit their findings both in our building and in the community. This will enable those traditionally least likely to access heritage the opportunity to experience the wealth of knowledge our young people will gain from their research. Part of that work is reproduced here on mywarrington. If you can add anything to the project, contact Jackie Cooling at the Relationships Centre, 19 Museum street, Warrington WA1 1JA or phone 01925 576757. 

mywarrington is pleased to support the project and gives Jackie and the youngsters the space here to promote it in the hope that some of you will be related to them or know what became of them. So here goes...

19-21 Museum Street as they looked on 10 Sep 2006.

17 Museum Street

Worrall family - lived at 17 Museum Street in 1881

Samuel Higginson Worrall was 21 years old at the time of the census and was employed as a post office clerk. His mother was Sarah Worrall, nee Higginson, a widow, and the family originated from Liverpool, moving to Warrington some time after Samuel's father's death when Samuel was only thirteen years old. Samuel's sister Mary Ann Milne and her daughter Mary Kirkaldy Milne, seven years old, also lived at the address. Samuel made the headlines in 1883 when he was imprisoned for five years for thefts of post from Warrington post office. The family eventually relocated to Stockport and on his release from prison, Samuel married a lady in Stockport and they eventually settled in Bury.

As the Worrall family were not natives of Warrington and moved on, I know it is unlikely that any of you are related to them. However, it would be interesting to know if any of you have similar stories, maybe of young relatives who ended up on the wrong side of the law during Victorian times and what happened to them. Punishments were certainly more severe in those days!

Greening family - lived at 17 Museum Street in 1891

The head of the household, Nathaniel Greening, wire manufacturer, was a member of the Greening family who were instrumental in bringing the wire industry to Warrington. Nathaniel and his wife, Elizabeth (nee Grime), had four children. Their eldest daughter, Elizabeth Annie, went on to marry Warrington Yorke, a famous parasitologist and professor of tropical medicine at Liverpool University. (You can read more from his Wikipedia page at the end of this page. Click here to read it now). Jackie Cooling has traced a descendant of theirs who she has spoken to about the project.

Sadly, Nathaniel and Elizabeth’s daughter, Lucy, died when she was 19 years old, and their other daughter, Gladys Mary, died when she was only six years old. Their only son, Nathaniel, known to the family as Jack, married a lady called Elsie Brotherton in 1917.

Do any of you know any stories of child workers employed by the Greening family in the wire industry, or any of the other industries in Warrington?

It is fair to say that many of the children of the Victorian era did not have a childhood. Many of them were employed in local industry from eight years of age, helping their cash-strapped parents to make ends meet. Any views on this would be welcome.

Although the Greening family were well provided for, they suffered two child deaths. It would be interesting to know what their cause of death was, and to compare this with the causes of deaths of other children in Warrington in the same era. Health care was not free and conditions for many were squalid, as clearly shown in images of Oliver Street, Hell Fire Square and the back alley ways off the town centre area.

Annie Barlow Woodcock

Annie Barlow Woodcock was the Greening family's servant.

Annie was 17 years old at the time of the census.

Annie's father, Richard, was originally from Bradford and his occupation is given as letter cutter and dye sinker on census returns. Annie's middle name, Barlow, was her mother Ann's maiden name. Annie's eldest sister, Elizabeth, was only thirteen years old when she died in 1879, and her brother, Henry Brook Woodcock died of heart disease in 1888, aged 19. Annie had two other siblings, Eliza born in 1871, and William, born in 1874.

Annie went on to marry Thomas Thurlow Cooper in Warrington in 1899, and it is believed that the couple had two daughters, Dorothy, born in Golborne in 1901, and Bertha, born in Earlestown in 1909. Thomas, Annie's husband, was a cycle maker and watch and clock repairer. The England Census 1911 shows the family living at 81 Haydock Street, Earlestown. There is a possible death recorded for Annie in Newton in 1963, aged 89.

Jackie found one possible relative for Annie. Does anyone else have any recollection of the family? It would be lovely to trace living relatives of Annie and show them where she used to work all those years ago.

We will also be looking at what life was like for servants during the Victorian era. No hoovers and washing machines then! We are also interested in what relations were like between masters and their servants....was it really like Downton Abbey?

Any thoughts on any of the above would be greatly appreciated.

The Toft family - lived at 17 Museum Street, Warrington in 1911

Charles Edward Toft lived at the address with his wife, Clara, and their only son, John Edward Toft, who was 14 years old in 1911. Charles was a baker, and it would appear that John Edward also became a baker and there is a possibility that he owned Toft's bakery in the town centre (maybe on Bridge Street).

Jackie has spoken to someone who has completed a family tree which includes John Edward and his family. It would appear that John Edward went on to marry a lady called Olive Mary Pennington at Bold Street Methodist Chapel in 1921 when he was 24 years old. The couple went on to have three children, Eileen Mary, born in 1924, John Pennington, born in 1929, and Gordon Charles, born in 1933.

A lady called Sue Wilson put a message on the Francis Firth website about Toft Bakery, It is believed that John Edward might have been her grandfather.

John Edward died at the age of 76 in Torbay, Devon in 1973.

Can anyone share any memories of Toft Bakery, or do you have any old images showing the Bakery? Are you related to the Toft family? It would love to hear from you!

The year when 19 Museum Street
was built in the brickwork of the building

19 Museum Street

The Willcocks family - lived at 19 Museum Street in 1881.

The head of the household, Edward John Willcocks, a clergyman, was the headmaster of Warrington Grammar School, which later went on to become Sir Thomas Boteler High. Rev. Willcocks was headmaster at the school from 1881 through to his death in 1907. Mr Willcocks was highly regarded and after his death a tablet was placed in the school in his memory.

Mr Willcocks and his wife, Edith Annie, had four children. The eldest child Edith Maud, was born in 1875. Edith went to a private school for girls in Sussex. Edith Maud was 23 when she married Reverend James Forbes in 1898. The couple had one daughter, Edith Annot H Forbes who was born in Bolton in 1900. Sadly Edith Maud died the following year aged 26. James went on to remarry.

Roger Durant Willcocks was born in 1876 and he attended Warrington Grammar School. Roger went to university and became a surgeon/physician and he served in the army in India. There are records of him being a surgeon at an asylum in Calicut, India. Roger married in India and later returned to Warrington with his wife and died in 1927 at the age of 50.

Edward Francis Willcocks was born in 1878, and he, like Roger, attended the grammar school where his father was headmaster. Edward was a Captain in the British Army during WW1. Edward married and was a solicitor in South Africa, which is where it would appear he resided until his death.

The address given for both Roger and Edward on records is Stanley House, Stanley Place in Warrington, which is shown in 1911 to be the address of their widowed mother.

Dorothy Willcocks, born in 1883, was the youngest child. It would appear that Dorothy never married and there is a possible death for Dorothy in Warrington in 1956.

Do any of you know of the Willcocks family? Have you any stories about Warrington Grammar School or what other education was available for children in the Victorian era? As we know, the majority of families were not as fortunate as the Willcocks family and the children had to work from a very young age and education was not a priority.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

Skinner family - lived at 19 Museum Street in 1891

Charles Skinner, the head of the household, was a glass manufacturer and a partner in the glass company, Messrs. Robinson & Sons and Skinner, Mersey Flint Glassworks, Warrington. He and his wife, Elizabeth, did not have any children.

Clara Andrews was the family's 20-year-old servant. Clara was born in Stratford, Manchester in 1871, the youngest daughter of Abraham and Emma Andrews. Clara had one older sister, Mary Emma, born in 1868.

Her father, Abraham was a warehouseman. Clara was only a small child when her mum passed away in 1874 at the age of 31. Abraham and his daughters went to live with his uncle and family after his wife's death.

Clara was 23 years old when she married Thomas Middleton, a wiredrawer, in 1893. The couple went on to have three daughters, Ada, born in 1893, Isabel, born in 1896, and Joyce born in 1906. There is a possible death listing for Clara in Warrington in 1966 at the grand age of 95.

Does anyone know the Middleton family and what became of Clara's daughters?

Does anyone have any stories of the life of relatives who were servants in the Victorian era?

What became of families who lost a parent early in life. There was no welfare state then.

Mr Skinner was a glass manufacturer. Does anyone have any stories or memorabilia for families who works in Warrington in the glass industry at the turn of the twentieth century ? Any thoughts or comment would be greatly appreciated!

The Richmond family - lived in 19 Museum Street in 1901

Charles Ernest Richmond, a native of Manchester, was the head of the household. He was a surgeon, and newspaper articles show him working in Manchester and Warrington infirmaries. Charles and his wife, Harriet, did not have any children.

They had one servant, Maria Skidmore, born in Warrington in 1880, who was 21 years old at the time of the census in 1901. The family had a visitor when the census was taken, a lady called Annie Green who was Maria Skidmore's aunt. So it can only be assumed that the Richmond's must have had a good relationship with Maria if they allowed her aunt to visit and stay with them.

Maria had seven siblings. Her mother and father, Ann and Joseph, originated from Silverdale in Staffordshire, and her father was employed in an ironworks. Maria's family are an example of families who came to Warrington from all over the country to work in the local industry.

In 1904, Maria married a local man, Henry Lawton, and the 1911 census shows Maria and Henry living at 12 Nelson Street, Warrington. Henry was employed as a labourer in a soap manufacturers.

The census shows that the couple had two children, Inez, born in 1908, and Henry born in 1910. Jackie has also found two other possible children from the marriage, Joseph born in 1914 and Lily born in 1919.

Maria passed away in Warrington in 1970, aged 90.

Do any of you know the Skidmore or Lawton family? It would be good to hear from you!

HJ in the brickwork of 21 Museum Street.
Do you know the origin of the initials?
The architect, perhaps?

21 Museum Street

Skelton family - lived at 21 Museum Street in 1881

William Partington Skelton, the head of the household, was born in Sheffield in 1856, and his family moved to Warrington sometime before 1861, because the census of that year shows them residing in Buttermarket Street. William’s father, Elijah, was a cutler (a person who makes cutlery). William was one of five children.

William was 24 years old when he married Mary Elizabeth Humphreys at St Mary’s Chapel, Great Sankey, in 1880. Mary was the only child of Charles and Mary Humphreys and Charles was a butler.

William was an ironmonger by trade and records show that his father, Elijah, did run a hardware and general dealership business from 20–22 Buttermarket Street.

William and Mary went on to have five children, all baptised at St Mary’s Church in Great Sankey. Their eldest son, Charles Partington Skelton, was born in 1881, Arthur was born in 1882, William Taylor in 1883, Wilfred in 1885 and Mary Elsie in 1886.

Sadly, Mary Elizabeth died in the winter of 1893, aged just 35 years. The couple’s eldest child, Charles, was only 12 years old, and the youngest, Mary Elsie was only seven.

What became of the Skelton children? How did their father cope which such a large family after the death of their mother at such a young age?

Can anyone help?

Hesketh family -  lived at 21 Museum Street, Warrington from 1891- 1911

John Hesketh, the head of the household, was a painter and decorator. He must have been successful because the census of 1881 shows that he employed four men and three boys. John was married to Jane Elizabeth (nee Ferriday). The couple had four children, Evelyn Mary, born in 1876, Ernest Sydney, born in 1878, George Evan, born on 5 April 1880, and Eleanor Ferriday, born in 1883.

Ernest died in 1881, when he was only three years old. Evelyn Mary died in 1886, aged nine.

George Evan went to Cambridge University, and he served as a Lieutenant in WW1. He then went on to be a schoolmaster in a private school in Surrey.

There is very little information available for Eleanor Ferriday, the couples youngest child. There is a death for Eleanor in 1942, and her probate record shows that she was a spinster, and that she died in The Sanatorium, Delamere, Cheshire, and that her home address was in Huyton, Liverpool. There is a listing for Crossley Sanatorium in Delamere, which was a tuberculosis sanatorium, so that is possibly where Eleanor spent her last days.

Does anyone know if any of the Hesketh family still live in Warrington?

If you can add any more information to the project, email me here at mywarrington or contact the Relationships Centre.

The Relationships Centre,
19 Museum Street,
Warrington,
Cheshire,
WA1 1JA

01925 576757

www.therelationshipscentre.co.uk

Click here to email The Relationships Centre

All information, apart from the photographs and the Wikipedia article, has been supplied to mywarrington
by Jackie Cooling, project worker for Us and Them and Way Back When Heritage Project. Many thanks.

Warrington Yorke

Warrington Yorke FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society) (11 April 1883 – 24 April 1943) was a British parasitologist, and Professor of Tropical Medicine at the University of Liverpool.

Early life and education

He was born at Lancaster, the son of Rev Henry Lefroy Yorke, a Wesleyan minister, and his wife, Margaret Warrington, the eldest of four brothers and two sisters.

He attended University School, Southport, and Epworth College, Rhyl, before studying medicine at the University of Liverpool.

Career

In 1907, he joined the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. From 1914 to 1929, he was Walter Myers professor of parasitology, and from 1929 until his death he was the Alfred Jones professor of tropical medicine, University of Liverpool.

During World War I, Yorke served as a Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps, based in Malta from 1915-16. He returned to Liverpool in 1916, and produced more than thirty reports, "Studies in the treatment of malaria".

Selected publications

"The Nematode Parasites of Vertebrates" (1926), with Philip Alan Maplestone

Awards and honours

In 1925, he was awarded the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Chalmers memorial gold medal, for his services to tropical medicine.

He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society on 5 May 1932.

Personal life

In 1916, he married Elizabeth Annie Greening; they had a son and a daughter.

Yorke died at his home, 4 Bryanston Road, Prenton, Birkenhead, on 24 April 1943 and was survived by his wife.

Read more in Wikipedia.

Warrington - A Town of Many Industries

mywarrington - created by Gordon I Gandy
Gordon_Radio_Warrington.jpg (52097 bytes) market_transport_show_120707_093.JPG (139965 bytes)
Local Radio - Local Issues - Local Presenters - Proud to be at the Heart of your Community.
Click the station banner, above, select 'Listen Live' and choose your media player.
Or install the TuneIn app on your smartphone or tablet and search for Radio Warrington
The mywarrington Radio Show every Friday lunchtime between 12 and 3 on Radio Warrington.

Home History Timeline Memory Lane Tour 1 Tour 2 Radio Warrington At The Flicks Mr Smith's Shop! Nineteen Nineties 19 Museum Street Legh Street Baths My Warrington RAF Burtonwood On The Waterfront 1 On The Waterfront 2 Warrington Green 1 Warrington Green 2 Sankey Valley On The Buses Peter's Gallery Walk Through Time Making Tracks 1 Making Tracks 2 Making Tracks 3 Warrington People Entertaining People Sporting People Warrington Wolves Warrington Market Classic Motor Shows Events On Top of the World The Bewsian Hamilton Street Golden Square Community Feedback